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How to Make Homemade Pasta

Staying home for the past year has many of us seeking new hobbies.  And since, we aren’t able to go to our favorite restaurants as often, those hobbies are likely directed towards the kitchen.  

Cooking and baking are now the favorite pastimes of many, and if you haven’t yet made your own pasta, now’s the time!  Below you’ll find two different pasta dough recipes – one for cut pasta and one for pasta shapes.  

You’ll need some special equipment for these recipes (or an amazing amount of patience), but once you taste the fruits of your own labor in the form of homemade pasta, you’ll soon realize – it’s totally worth it.


Cut Pasta Dough Recipe

Cut pasta requires a pliable dough that can be rolled thin and either hand-cut or cut by machine.  Once you nail down this basic recipe, mix it up by adding fresh herbs or spices.

Prep Time: 1 hour

Cook Time: (n/a)

Total Time: 1 hour

Yield: 1 lb. of pasta dough

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups Harris Teeter Unbleached All-Purpose Flour, plus more for dusting
  • ½ tsp. Kosher salt
  • 2 Harris Teeter Large Eggs
  • 1 Tbsp. olive oil
  • sprinkling of water, if necessary

Special Equipment:

  • Plastic Wrap
  • Food Processor or Stand Mixer with Dough Blade or Hook (optional)
  • Rolling Pin
  • Pasta Roller and Cutter (optional)



Directions:

  1. Whisk eggs and olive oil in a large measuring cup and set aside.

  2. Add flour and salt to the bowl of mixer and blend well.  Slowly add in oil and eggs and mix with dough blade/hook until dough begins to form a mass and doesn’t stick to the sides of the bowl.  This will take several minutes.  If the mixture is too dry, add just a touch of water.  

  3. Alternatively, you make a mountain of the flour in the center of a work surface. Hollow out a well in the middle. Have a pastry scraper or spatula handy. Pour the egg mixture into the well. Start incorporating shallow scrapings of the flour from the walls of the well into the eggs. Stop any liquids from running off with the pastry scraper or spatula.  Continue until you form a dough ball.

  4. Remove the dough onto a clean, lightly floured surface and knead by hand for several minutes, until smooth.

  5. Wrap the ball of dough in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 30 minutes or up to 2 days before cutting.  Alternatively, pasta dough can be stored in the freezer for up to 1 month.  Thaw dough completely before cutting.

  6. Divide the dough into four parts.  Start with one section and cover the remaining dough with a damp towel.

  7. To roll and cut your pasta using a pasta roller and cutter:  Roll out the first section of dough with a rolling pin.  If using a pasta cutter, use the pasta sheet roller at the widest setting and roll the piece of dough through.  Repeat once, then dial down the setting, rolling 2 times each setting until the desired thickness.

  8. Use the pasta cutter to trim the thinned dough to your desired thickness.

  9. Lay cut pasta strands on floured baking sheets to dry or on pasta drying rack.

  10. Repeat with the remaining dough.

  11. To roll and cut your pasta by hand:  Roll out the first section of dough on a floured surface as thin as you can possibly make it.

  12. Dust the top surface of the dough with flour and loosely roll up the pasta sheet.  Use a knife to cut the strands into ¼ inch strips.

  13. Lay cut pasta strands on floured baking sheets to dry or on pasta drying rack.

  14. Repeat with the remaining dough.

  15. Dry completely or prepare the pasta.  

  16. Cooking times will vary by dryness and thickness of the noodle. To cook, bring a large pot of salted water to a boil and drop in the pasta.  Cook until the noodles float to the top or are an al dente texture.  Drain and serve with your sauce of choice.


Pressed Pasta Dough Recipe

Those that loved playing with play-dough as a kid will love making their own pasta shapes with a pasta press!  It’s all the fun of the childhood activity, with the added bonus of being able to eat your creation!  This recipe results in a dry and crumbly dough perfect for shaping.

Prep Time: 1 hour

Cook Time: (n/a)

Total Time: 1 hour

Yield: 1 lb. of pasta dough

Ingredients:

  • 7 ounces semolina flour
  • 7 ounces Harris Teeter Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
  • 4 Harris Teeter Large Eggs, lightly whisked
  • between ½ Tbsp. and 2 Tbsp. of water
  • Special Equipment:
  • Plastic Wrap
  • Kitchen Scale
  • Stand Mixer with Dough Hook
  • Pasta Press/Extruder


Directions:

  1. Weigh flours using a kitchen scale for precision.  

  2. Pour the flours into the stand mixer and use the dough hook to blend.

  3. While mixing on a low setting, slowly pour in the eggs.  Add ½ Tbsp. of water.  

  4. Continue mixing for 2-3 minutes.  

  5. Stop the mixer and if ¾ of the dough doesn’t form a ball when pressed with your hands, add another ½ Tbsp. of water and mix again until it does.  Repeat as needed until just wet enough to form that ball.  You want a crumbly dough for this recipe.

  6. Once most of the dough can be pressed into the ball, empty the dough and crumbs onto a clean surface and knead with your hands until you get most of the flour mixed in and you can form a crumbly ball of dough.  Wrap with plastic wrap and allow to rest for 30 minutes.

  7. Dough can be refrigerated up to 2 days before pressing -or- stored in the freezer for up to 1 month.  Thaw dough completely before shaping.

  8. When ready to make your pasta shape, roll walnut-sized balls of dough and drop them into your pasta press.  Refer to the pasta press instructions for further direction.

  9. Place shapes onto a floured baking sheet.

  10. Dry completely or prepare the pasta.  

  11. Cooking times will vary by dryness and thickness of the noodle. To cook, bring a large pot of salted water to a boil and drop in the pasta.  Cook until the noodles float to the top or are an al dente texture.  Drain and serve with your sauce of choice.


Katie Harding is the publisher of Forks and Folly . A self-taught cook and die-hard foodie, Katie lives in Charlotte with her husband and three boys. Besides cooking and eating, she loves craft beers, running, and napping.